Shaping places of resilience for nations through planning strategies: Protection, Integration, Adaptation and Preparedness

Shaping places of resilience for nations through planning strategies: Protection, Integration, Adaptation and Preparedness

On 21st June 2022, at the Shape the World Summit 2022 organized by enCity’s partner, Consulus, our CEO and Co-Founder, Dzung Do Nguyen shared his insights on Shaping Places of Resilience for a Nation.
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In the face of increasing global uncertainty, it has become integral to plan cities and systems that are resilient; which can not only withstand the test of challenges, but thrive under all difficult circumstances so that people can flourish.

On 21st June 2022, at the Shape the World Summit 2022 organized by enCity’s partner, Consulus, our CEO and Co-Founder, Dzung Do Nguyen shared his insights on Shaping Places of Resilience for a Nation. He proposed a framework with 4 stages at the summit which was held in Singapore and also featured speakers from social enterprises and businesses who have built upon their strategies for resilience in their respective industries. The framework proposes 1) Protection, 2) Integration, 3) Adaptation and 4) Preparedness for place resilience.

The four stages of building resilience in urban environments

 

Protection from unforeseen events such natural disasters, the pandemic and political events 

Takeaways from recent events that have impacted the globe, which range from natural disasters, the pandemic and political events show us that cities and its people need protection in the short term to protect ourselves, for survival. For example, to reduce the spread of the virus we have to shut down our borders when vaccines are not available. We also have to protect our coasts and build dikes as sea levels rise due to climate change. In terms of planning protection mandates that basic infrastructure is fundamental to our survival.

Integration of nature in communities and different uses within vicinity

In the short to medium term, planning for development and land-use go hand in hand. For example, to isolate communities and production hubs during the pandemic we have to design for people to be able to live, eat and work within a small radius to curb the spread of the disease and maintain daily activities. Studying and analyzing conditions during and after the pandemic can translate into long term lessons for the future.  We also need to find a way to bring nature into communities to improve well-being and ensure that a local lock-down doesn’t lead to social stress. A combination of a production value chain, from R&D to prototyping, mass production to sale and marking all  in one place will avoid logistic disruption and foster innovation and 3D printing-enabled product localization.

In Binh Duong Province we planned four clusters integrated together; the innovation hub, production cluster, agriculture and recreational zone, and living community to create self-sustaining townships.

Adaptation to new conditions

In the medium to long term, planning needs to cater for adaptation to changing environmental and economic conditions. Our cities also need to adapt to living amidst increasing water levels and constant flooding, like floating villages in the Netherlands. Another example is our innovative land use system proposed for Ben Tre province in the Mekong Delta. We replace the conventional land use system which dictates the functions and the type of crops locals can farm using a water-resourced-based system which informs farmers on the type of water; fresh, blackish or salt water, available in an area either through irrigation and coastal defense systems. Farmers and landowners are then equipped with the  best knowledge to choose a suitable function for their land. Through planning and design we can affect people’s behavior to be more adaptable to new circumstances.

 

In our project at Ben Tre, infrastructure with better transport networks and roads which also act as dikes has been proposed and the land use system is based on the source of water

Preparedness for unforeseen circumstances

In the longer term, people need to be prepared for unexpected challenges, usually in terms of capacity for healthcare, (medical) resources, supplies or evacuation. This gears more toward emergency readiness. Critical infrastructure can play multiple functions, for example a highway can be a coastal dyke and an evacuation route during a flood event so that when unexpected events occur, existing infrastructure can cater to new needs that arise towards best possible outcomes for communities that are affected.

Dzung Do Nguyen sharing his thoughts on shaping places of resilience at the Shape the World Summit 2022

Planning and design is usually most relevant during the integration and adaptation stages, involving medium-long term strategies for urban development. enCity has developed strategies which are flexible and adaptable to local conditions and needs and is constantly working toward integrating solutions and latest know-how into our plans so we can share valuable lessons that lead us towards a resilient future.

 

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To reduce the spread of the virus we have to shut down our borders when vaccines are not available. We also have to protect our coasts and build dikes as sea levels rise due to climate change. In terms of planning protection mandates that basic infrastructure is fundamental to our survival. 

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